Aesthetics Wiki
Tag: Visual edit
Tag: Visual edit
''Warning: This page may content sensitive subject matter as the Skinheads have been linked to white nationalism, neo-Nazism, white power, and acts of terrorism. It should be important to note, however, that the Skinheads weren't always a white supremacist aesthetic and we hope this page actively promotes the idea that the Skinhead aesthetic isn't inherently racist and only got infected by racists later on.''{{Aesthetic|title1=Skinheads|decade_of_origin=1960s|related_brands=Fred Perry, Ben Sherman, Lonsdale, Everlast, Dr. Martens|image1=1920px-Gay_skinheads_kissing.jpg|caption1=Gay Skinheads}}'''Skinheads '''are members of a subculture originated among working-class youths in London, England, in the 1960s and soon spread to other parts of the United Kingdom, with a second working class skinhead movement emerging worldwide in the 1980s.
 
"Skinheads" started as an fashion/subculture heavily influenced by the Jamaican <nowiki>[[Rudeboy]]</nowiki>sRudeboys and Ska music which had brought to England by West Indian immigrants, as well as British [[Mods]], African-American soul and R&B, and early Rock and Roll.
 
The early skinheads were not necessarily part of any political movement, but as the 1970s progressed, the skinheads became more politically active and acts of racially motivated skinhead violence began to occur in the United Kingdom and did become divided along far-right and far-left lines. As a result of this change within the skinheads, far-right groups such as the National Front and the British Movement saw a rise in the number of white power skinheads among their ranks, while the far-left started forming groups like Red Action (formed in 1981), Anti-Fascist Action (formed in 1985), and the globally-known Skinheads Against Racial Prejudice (formed in 1987). By the late 1970s, the mass media, and subsequently the general public, had largely come to view the skinhead subculture as one that promotes racism and Neo-Nazism.<span style="font-size:11px;"> </span>The white power and neo-Nazi skinhead subculture eventually spread to North America and other areas of the world. In the modern era, the white power skinhead culture became part of what has come to be known as "The Alt-Right".