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The following article contains and discusses content that may be distressing to some readers.
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This aesthetic contains macabre imagery, including horror and topics of sexuality. This article does not contain any sexual imagery due to the Fandom TOS, but gory imagery in this aesthetic is inevitable. There are descriptions of graphic imagery included in this article, which can be triggering to many people. Reader discretion is heavily advised
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Ero-Guro (エログロ), short for "erotic grotesque nonsense", is a Japanese art movement and literary genre that focuses on disturbing imagery combined with topics of sexual/romantic and surreal ambients. The genre itself surged in the 1920s as a reaction towards the taboo topics of Japanese society; combining the elements of eroticism (ero) with grotesque imagery (guro). [1]

Ero-Guro art can be divided in various styles; some artworks are more similiar to Japanese folk art, while some have more in common with modern anime and manga, and some artworks are more shocking than others. This art movement has inspired various other aesthetics, including Angura and partially Breakcore.

History[]

Ero-Guro surged during the 1920s-1930s as a reaction to the subjects that were deemed taboo in the Japanese society of the time. Ero-guro artists sought to challenge societal norms and explore taboo subjects through their artworks and written literature. It was a time of social and political tension in Japan, particularly because it was the Interwar period. It was influenced by various artistic movements such as German Expressionism, Surrealism, and the decadent literature of Europe, as well as traditional Japanese folk art.

The movement was infamously considered controversial and even faced repression and censorship during World War II, but it re-emerged during the Postwar period, particularly in anime and manga.

Visuals[]

Ero-Guro often features explicit or suggestive sexual themes and can range from nudity and sexual acts to depictions of various fetishes. However, it isn't always the central focus but rather an element intertwined with elements of horror, the macabre, and the grotesque. This is not limited to but also includes depictions of mutilation, disfigurement, bodily transformations, and sometimes extreme violence or disturbing scenes.

There is a frequent use of surreal or dream-like elements in Ero-Guro, blurring the line between reality and fantasy. It makes the works appear bizarre, abstract, or fantastical, with the purpose of challenging the viewers perceptions. There are many stark contrasts, vibrant colors, and exaggerated features to create a visually striking and impactful aesthetic.

Media[]

Manga[]

  • Death Face
  • Jigoku
  • Jigoku no Komoriuta
  • Kijin Gahou
  • Korokoro Soushi: Ooedo Krispy Tengai
  • Korokoro Soushi: Ooedo Muzan Juusanku
  • Paranoia Star
  • Shin Gendai Ryoukiden
  • Shin National Kid
  • Shoujo Tsubaki
  • Yami no Hou e
  • Yume no Q-SAKU

Movies[]

  • Guilty of Romance (2011)
  • Love Exposure (2009)
  • Midori (1992)
  • Noriko's Dinner Table (2006)
  • Orgies of Edo (1969)
  • Strange Circus (2005)
  • Suicide Club (2001)

Artists[]

  • Henmaru Machino
  • Lucio Maekawa
  • Shintaro Kago
  • Suehiro Maruo
  • Takato Yamamoto
  • Teruo Ishii
  • Toshio Maeda
  • Toshio Saeki
  • Usamaru Furuya
  • Yumeno Kyuusaku
  • Junji Ito

Magazines[]

  • Garo
  • Takarajima
  • Yasou

Gallery[]

References[]

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