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Sensitive Content Notice ⚠️
The following article contains and discusses content that may be distressing to some readers.
Reason for Warning: This article contains imagery of creepy/disturbing content. Viewer discretion is advised.

Digital Horror is the modern relative of Analog Horror and subgenre of Unfiction Horror which incorporates the use of screen recordings, online websites, web games, etc. that has existed during the early 2000's - mid 2010's. Most examples of digital horror may incorporate elements of existential horror, Lovecraftian horror, and the feelings of dread and/or nostalgia.

Visuals[]

While there are no defining visuals for Digital Horror, there are some key aesthetics most Digital Horror include, such as low quality footage, usage of the Comic Sans font, and the use of old editing and recording software such as Bandicam.

Media[]

Webseries and one-off Digital Horror[]

Channels and Social Media Accounts[]

Video Games[]

  • I'm On Observation Duty (by Notovia) (despite being a parody of the Analog Horror, the gameplay itself is digitized)
  • Baldi's Basics in Education and Learning (by mystman12) (despite being a parody, it is also considered an indie horror game because of its art and animation style)
  • Doki Doki Literature Club! (by Team Salvato)
  • Sad Satan (by PlanscautZK.) (controversial due to featuring real gore images)
  • Around The Bend And Back Again (by r0xyisdreaming)
  • Manhunt & Manhunt 2 by Rockstar Games (possibly digital horror games)
  • KinitoPET (by troy_en)

Doom WADs[]

  • the thing you can't defeat (by youropinionsareWRONGs)
  • MyHouse.wad (by Steve Nelson)
  • 7869.wad (by Doomworld Anon)

Film[]

  • The Blair Witch Project (by Daniel Myrick, Eduardo Sánchez) (1999)
  • Searching (by Aneesh Chaganty) (2018)
  • Missing (by Nicholas D. Johnson, Will Merrick) (2023)
  • Unfriended (by Levan Gabriadze) (2014)
  • Cloverfield (by Matt Reeves) (2008)
  • Creep (by Patrick Brice) (2014)
  • Paranormal Activity (by Oren Peli) (2010)
  • As Above, So Below (by John Erick Dowdle) (2014)

ARGs[]

Music[]

Akin to Analog Horror, Digital Horror isn't music based, but there are some songs that fit the Digital Horror aesthetic. They mostly include EDM, trap, lo-fi, and other music genres similar to those mentioned.

Artists[]

  • Cartoon
  • TheFatRat
  • C418
  • Chilledcow
  • OMFG
  • Marshmello
  • Dadfeels
  • Elektronomia
  • Different Heaven
  • Kevin Macleod
  • Myuu
  • LCD Soundsystem
  • The Living Tombstone
  • GHOST-P
  • Knife Party

Playlists[]

Common Misconceptions[]

People usually get Digital Horror confused with Analog Horror and ARGs (Alternate Reality Games) genres usually because of their stylistic qualities. Most digital horror videos are low quality to mimic the style of 2000's YouTube videos and most Analog Horror videos have low quality and/or grainy footage which confuses people with the two aesthetics. People occasionally refer to Digital Horror as "ARGs" even when there is no ARG in the digital horror. A few Digital Horror series do have some ARGs in them such as The June Archives and some ARGs have been classified as "Digital Horror" such as hiimmarymary and i_know_where_she_is. Digital Horror has been getting more attention thanks to YouTubers like Sagan Hawkes discussing about this topic, and thanks to that a lot of people can now properly differentiate between Digital Horror, Analog Horror and ARGs.

Gallery[]

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