Aesthetics Wiki
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Cult Party Kei (カルトパーティー系) is a Japanese vintage fashion with a focus on many sheer layers and religious imagery. The name is derived from the store Cult Party which popularized that style, but the name isn't actually used in Japan.

Cult Party Kei is often confused with Mori Kei.

Fashion

Cult Party Kei is primarily a second hand/thrifted fashion. For colors it’s best to go monotone, 2-3 colors. Most outfits are white or cream for the most part; red is also very popular. Usually faded colors are worn, but some pastels are used, especially for pink colors and nightgowns. Too many pastels can make an outfit look fairy kei, unless you add enough cpk accessories/touches. Quilts used for jackets and skirts and yo-yo accessories are usually very colorful though.

The silhouette is usually slightly baggy/loose fitting, but with a slightly/loosely defined high waist (around your natural waist line or higher) but not with a tightly belted waist. Shirts are usually tucked under skirts/pants, but not always, and most of the time the neckline is high. Layering can be as few as a shirt, camisole, skirt or shorts and peignoir, or even just a shirt and a skirt, and up to however many layers you want.

Poofy skirts are the most popular; tiered, ruffled, lacey, mesh, chiffon-y etc.  Usually they are mid length or short; sometimes long ones are used though.You can layer skirts to add more volume if needed. Vintage nylon petticoats are very popular, short ones can be tough to find, but longer ones can be worn high for an empire waist effect, suspenders can be used to help keep the skirt up. Any skirt can be worn this way as well, manapyon does this often. Sometimes even pulling the skirt up to your armpits to make a dress style look can work. Gingham skirts and sort of kitchy country style skirts are fairly popular, especially in red. You can also do 90’s jeans or slightly baggy pajama-ish looking pants, they’re often rolled up at the hems. Jean shorts (cut off or with folded up hems) are used as well. Gingham pants are great too. Skirts can be worn over pants or shorts, especially short poofy petticoats.

Definitely the most well known aspect of CPK is the peignoir. However it is not necessary to wear a peignoir to have a cpk outfit. Pretty much any vintage robe or peignoir will work for CPK, transparent ones are the most popular. Cotton ones are nice too, and usually easier to find in thrift shops. They are most often worn as the outer layer. However, they can also be worn under a cardigan, under a sweater or shirt, you can use your suspenders to keep them around your waist, and you can also tie the ends around your waist. Bed jackets, nightgowns and camisoles can also add some nylon to your outfit to make it look more CPK. Nightgowns can be worn as dresses, transparent ones are worn over a top/bottom or an opaque nightgown.

Tights or thigh highs are almost always worn when wearing skirts or shorts. Printed tights are very popular, as well as semi opaque white tights. Lace tights are good as well. Black or white thigh highs are popular, either plain or with lace at the top. Printed thigh highs can work as well, ones like grimoire’s are good, or ones with cherries, bows or hearts. Lace trimmed ankle socks are very popular and a really good item to have. In warmer weather you can wear just ankle socks to keep cool.

Most often Rocking horse shoes and Tokyo boppers are used. Sneakers are also really popular. Platform converse and the Vivienne westwood wing platforms are sometimes worn as well. A lot of the The Virgin Mary girls wear thrifted shoes in a lot of different usually 90’s styles. Mary janes, ballerina style flats, and most Lolita shoes are options as well.

Dark Cult Party Kei

An example of the Dark Cult Party Kei look.

Dark Cult Party Kei is similar to Cult Party Kei, but with more of a focus on darker colors. It still follows a lot of the same rules laid out in Cult Party Kei, though with a different palette of colors.

Resources

External links to help get a better understanding of this aesthetic.

Blogs

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